Packaging Testing Category Packaging Testing Articles

Packaging testing is the testing of materials, components, units and interactions of the package. Multiple tests are done on packaging to ensure maximum safety and quality assurance with regards to specification and regulation. Testing prototypes and concepts can help identify problematic errors and cost effectiveness. Risk management, product liability and patents more

Packaging testing is the testing of materials, components, units and interactions of the package. Multiple tests are done on packaging to ensure maximum safety and quality assurance with regards to specification and regulation. Testing prototypes and concepts can help identify problematic errors and cost effectiveness. Risk management, product liability and patents are all areas of packaging that need to be tested and modified. Some examples of testing are food packaging, which must withstand the problems associated with distribution and storage until it reaches the customer. Tests covered include transit, closure torque, friction, drop, material, compression, tear, tensile strength, mullen burst, vibration, leak and peel test. Other areas covered include: Packaging analysis and testing, packaging migration analysis, integrity testing, taint analysis, active packaging, child resistant and intelligent packaging.

Permeability Testing is used to test the permeability of a package, that being, to see how much liquid or gas can make its way into the package, potentially damaging the product housed within. One method uses a central module which is separated by the test film; the testing gas is fed on the one side of the cell and the permeated gas is carried to the detector by a sweep gas. The diagram on the right shows a testing cell for films, normally made from metals like stainless steel. The testing medium (liquid or gas) is situated in the inner pipe and the permeate is collected in the space between the pipe and the glass wall. It is transported by a sweep gas to an analysing device.

Seal testing is integral as it ensures seals are airtight, therefore not allowing air or water in or out of the package. Examples that use this method include items such as thermos flasks, bottles containing beverages and also pharmaceutical packaging. Standard test methods are available for measuring the moisture vapour transmission rate, oxygen transmission rate etc, of the packaging materials. Completed packages, however, involve heat seals, joints and closures that often reduce the effective barrier of the package. For example, the glass of a glass bottle may have an effective total barrier but the screw cap closure and the closure liner may not.

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