India to Develop Anti Radiation Missile

India to Develop Anti Radiation Missile

posted by Kevin Kostiner | 30.04.2012

India are set to develop an anti radiation missile designed to detect and home in on enemy radar positions.

After successfully launching its long range Agni V missile India is now developing a new anti radiation (ARM) missile designed to destroy enemy radars.

ARM missiles detect and home in on enemy radio emissions and are most commonly used against air defence batteries such as SAM (Surface to Air Missiles) sites disabling their radar system, preventing accurate strikes against aircraft. Modern ARM missile's can detect a radar by tracking its electro-magnetic radiation and pulses independent of the radar wavelength.

Indian Missile Development

The Defence Research and Development Laboratory (DRDL) are developing the missile to fit the Indian Sukhoi fighter Su-30 MKI. The Indian air force will soon have a fleet of over 240 Su-30's as a further 100 more are on order from Russia adding to the existing 140 in use.

Recent conflicts such as the Gulf Wars saw the wide spread use of the ARM missile as NATO forces gained air superiority suppressing ground forces from the air. The US operated with the AGM-88 HARM missile and the UK with the ALARM missile (as pictured above).

The Indian military has been recently been developing and acquiring new military technology to improve and extend its operational capabilities. Recent developments include the Agni-V long range missile and the leasing of the Russian Nuclear powered submarine.

Additional missile developments include plans for new air to air and surface to air missiles and the flight trial of the short range 'Prahar' surface to surface missile.

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